Managing Health Care Costs Through Better Lifestyle & Mindset

Leveraging Two-way communication through Mobile Technology


Better Lifestyle & Mindset
In Chronic conditions such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and orthopedic disorders

Lifestyle & Costs
We know that better lifestyle habits of good nutrition and active lifestyle along with maintaining a healthy mindset has a significant impact on improving outcomes and reducing complications related to chronic conditions.

It has been reported that most (about 60%-70%) health care visits in industrialized countries are correlated with lifestyle-induced preventable diseases. Even adherence to medications for primary and secondary prevention remains insufficient globally. Clear evidence exists where complications can be reduced or the rate of progression can be slowed down by patients following a recommended lifestyle change in the areas of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Also, the onset of the chronic condition may be prevented or delayed by following the recommendations related to lifestyle.

In Dean Ornish, MD et al, paper, Intensive Lifestyle Changes for Reversal of Coronary Heart Disease (4), adherers to diet and exercise had a 50% lower risk for all major complications in 6 months compared with non-adherers. Additionally, in Clara K. Chow, MBBS, FRACP, PhD et al paper Association of Diet, Exercise, and Smoking Modification With Risk of Early Cardiovascular Events After Acute Coronary Syndromes (5), related to coronary atherosclerosis, 82% of experimental-group patients had an average change towards regression. The cost of treating type 2 diabetes has been estimated to be well above $101 billion annually. More than 600,000 deaths (1 in 4) are attributable to heart disease each year and accounts for more than $70 billion spent. Clearly, by reducing the complications wrought by the chronic conditions, the overall health care costs can be reduced through better lifestyle and mindset habits.

  1. Minich DM, Bland JS. Personalized lifestyle medicine: Relevance for nutrition and lifestyle recommendations. Scientific World Journal 2013 Jun26;2013:129841. DOI: https://doi. org/10.1155/2013/129841.
  2. Thomas A. Gaziano Lifestyle and Cardiovascular Disease. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Vol 69. No. 9, 2017 Editorial Comment http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2016.12.019 Lifestyle Medicine: A Brief Review of Its Dramatic Impact on Health and
    Survival The Permanente Journal/Perm J 2018;22:17-025 https://doi.org/10.7812/TPP/17-025
  3. Intensive Lifestyle Changes for Reversal of Coronary Heart Disease Dean Ornish, MD; Larry W. Scherwitz, PhD; James H. Billings, PhD, MPH; K. Lance Gould, MD; Terri A. Merritt, MS; Stephen Sparler, MA; William T. Armstrong, MD; Thomas A. Ports, MD; Richard L. Kirkeeide, PhD; Charissa Hogeboom, PhD; Richard J. Brand, PhD JAMA, December 16, 1998—Vol 280, No. 23
  4. Association of Diet, Exercise, and Smoking Modification With Risk of Early Cardiovascular Events After Acute Coronary Syndromes. Clara K. Chow, MBBS, FRACP, PhD; Sanjit Jolly, MD, MSc, FRCPC; Purnima Rao-Melacini, MSc; Keith A.A. Fox, BSc (Hons), MB, ChB, FRCP, FESC, FMedSci; Sonia S. Anand, MD, PhD, FRCPc; Salim Yusuf, DPhil, FRCPC, FRSC750 DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.891523
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